Raising Anti-Racist White Children

An online, live interactive workshop for parents and educators offering information and guidance on how to prepare white children in our increasingly multiracial society. The workshop encourages the development of an anti-racist outlook in all children, and focuses on the particular experience of raising white children.

Preparing White Children for the Multiracial Future!

This workshop takes place using the Zoom online conferencing software. During the workshop we will:

  • Educate you about children’s grasp of race & racism
  • Inspire and empower you to model and teach anti-racism
  • Boost your confidence in teaching children anti-racism
  • Show you how to counter the present culture of colorblindness with more effective strategies
  • Help you raise white children who have an aware and healthy racial identify and the potential to join the next generation of anti-racist healers and organizers

Upcoming Opportunities

 

No event found!

The workshop will provide you with information, tools, analysis, strategies, language, and resources. We will also explain the importance of a positive anti-racist racial identity in white children while engaging you in small and large group discussions and guided study.

Who Should Attend

The workshop is open to anyone who is interested in teaching white children about race and will be very helpful in particular to:

  • Parents
  • Grandparents
  • Godparents
  • Guardians
  • Caretakers
  • Teachers
  • Educators
  • Service Professionals who work with children (e.g. counselors, case workers, advocates, etc.)
  • Community members with a concern for raising the next generation of anti-racists

Workshop Topics

  • What and when children learn about racism
  • How and when to talk with children about race and racism
  • Media literacy for children
  • Auditing juvenile books for racist and/or anti-racist content
  • Helping white children develop a positive anti-racist white identity
  • Dealing with microaggressions

Did you know?

Among families with kindergarteners, white parents are 3 times less likely to discuss race than parents of color.

75% of white parents never, or almost never talk about race.

First graders placed in cross-racial study groups changed their play habits in a positive way, while third graders placed in similar cross-racial study groups did not.

Researchers speculate there is a “developmental window” when positive crossracial habits are most readily learned.

“The more diverse the junior high school or high school, the more the kids self segregate by race and ethnicity within school, and thus the likelihood that any two kids of different races have a friendship goes down.” — from Even Babies Discriminate: A Nutureshock excerpt by Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman

“The more children know about the seriousness of racial-ethnic oppression and its consequences, the more they will be equipped to contest it in their present and future lives.” – from The First R: How Children Learn Race and Racism by Debra Van Ausdale & Joe R. Feagin

“Katz and Kofkin (1997) found that infants are able to nonverbally categorize people by race and gender at six months of age…. and numerous studies show that three- to five-year-olds not only categorize people by race, but express bias based on race.” – from “Children Are Not Colorblind: How Young Children Learn Race” by Erin N. Winkler, Ph.D.

“Over 3 in 10 white millennials believe blacks to be lazier or less hardworking than whites, and a similar number say lack of motivation is a reason why they are less financially well off as a group. Just under a quarter believes blacks are less intelligent…” – from “Millennials are just about as racist as their parents” by Scott Clement

What people are saying…

Phenomenal work. I am so grateful for your leadership and teaching. The section on children learning racism was enlightening. If we don’t talk to our kids about anti-racism, institutionalized racism will have all the power of influence. This whole concept of tools to nurture a positive racial identity in white children was exactly the next step I’ve been looking for. Thank you for positively encouraging us to confront and accept our own whiteness.

Jen Rutner

Thoughtful group, very well facilitated, enough time to process. Lots to think about. I have always felt committed to raising anti-racist white children, but now I have the tools. Feeling empowered.

Lila Barchetto

The workshop fueled my excitement and commitment to raising anti-racist white children.

Rachel Brown

The workshop continued to deepen my understanding of racism and ways in which we can oppose/counter it as parents and teachers. Articles were very helpful.

Laura Bilodeau

I especially liked the media literacy PowerPoint, although that also hit me emotionally…. I thought both trainers were such amazing facilitators and you guided the discussion gracefully and compassionately.

Emma Timbers